Design Studio IIA – Kaitiakitanga

kaitiakitanga: homegrown resilience

… the sustainability movement’s politics, not to mention its marketing, have led to a popular misunderstanding: that a perfect, stasis-under-glass equilibrium is achievable. But the world doesn’t work that way: it exists in a constant disequilibrium — trying, failing, adapting, learning and evolving in endless cycles…

“Resilience” … doesn’t propose a single, fixed future. It assumes we don’t know exactly how things will unfold, that we’ll be surprised, that we’ll make mistakes along the way. It’s also open to learning from the extraordinary and widespread resilience of the natural world…

originally printed in The New York Times. ©2012 by Andrew Zolli

Aim

Develop an understanding of the term kaitiakitanga and how it can become an informing principle for the adaptive reuse of residential buildings. To understand how design is concerned with future oriented problems.

Context

This project responds to aspects of kaitiakitanga. It examines guardianship of resources, and includes broader ideas of ‘sustainability’ and ethical considerations. It encourages you to think about where materials come from and the consequences of their use.

Kaitiakitanga begins with an holistic understanding of how the environment and the people within it exist in balance, and a care to maintain that balance. What is your role as a creative practitioner in negotiating that balance? How does your work impact on the environment and on people through its manufacture, or its content, or its use?

Project

For this project you will renovate the entire house of 20 wallace street responding to the site. You are asked to design with consideration for the predicted issues confronting us at local, regional and global levels. Take a stand! Should we keep significant aspects of these historic dwellings? What modifications are necessary to nurture and sustain future generations? Can we sensitively integrate contemporary design methods and technologies? You will be guided in the use of an abstract ‘generator’ with an aim to produce creative spatial ‘solutions’ to the problems of future re-design.

Ted Talk by Bjarke Ingels – Hedonistic Sustainability

student group blogs

 

Name: Team Members: Blog Address:
chrisjoewilllivrochellely Chris, Joe, Will, Liv, Rochelle, Ly chrisjoewilllivrochelle.tumblr.com/
on the fence Vanessa, Kelly, Cassandra, Bryony, Sasha spaceonthefence.wordpress.com
Kaitiakitanga5 Nga Roma, Emi, Maddy, Paige,Elliot www.tumblr.com/blog/kaitiakitanga5
jmnbs Molly S, Julia, Natalie, Bamboo, Sopanha jmnbs-spatial200.tumblr.com
Barefoot Studios Anna, Emily, Christina, Helen, Sarah spatialdesignstudio.tumblr.com/post/117062121453/models
High Density Lewis, Amber, Jordyn, Etanah, Ellie, Bree spatialdesign200.blogspot.co.nz
Green Xtreme Machine Zoe, Liam, Greta, Bianca, Pieta
20wallacestreetrenovation.wordpress.com
Connor, Molly B, Greer, Irina, Megan

student work – Puna – 2015

This project responds to aspects of puna. It examines the way that ideas are generated and developed, the negotiation of authorship and ownership and the relationships between creative practitioners, clients and communities. The brief to design a room based on their clients ritual.

week 7

xe - kaitiakitanga

Kaitiakitanga, 2014 by Xavier Ellah digital drawings- xespatialstudio.tumblr.com/archive/2014/4

What?

  • Introducing the paper
  • Unpack and discuss the significance of Kaitiakitanga
  • Introduction to typical design phases and how we will be working differently
  • Breakdown of the next 6 weeks
  • Group assignment task
  • Design exercises exploring generative spatial concepts
  • Sustainable solutions/ Material report/ Pre design (Groups)
  • Shared moment 4B06 Monday 11-12

Why?

  • In bringing your exploration of the ‘generative spatial concept’ to a suite of ‘real’ building issues you will be guided toward a process of ‘thinking aesthetically.’
  • Having the ability to ‘think through’ a complex array of information and concerns, with spatial and material qualities is an important skill to acquire.
  • For this project you will be working primality in groups

How?

  • You will be allocated a generative spatial concept either: Tawhio – encircling, enfolding, Aparia – to heap up layer by layer, Taiponapona – to tie in knots, fasten with knots, Paiherengia – to bind together in a bundle, Āpiti – (to add, put together, place side by side, supplement, annex, append; (noun) friend), Kotikoti – to cut to pieces, dice, divide, lay out boundaries.
  • You will be allocated a group for the Sustainable solutions/ material/ pre design reports. You are to write a report summerising each chapter. This document is to be formatted using arial size 10 font and handed in as a Pdf for all to have access too. There will also be a class discussion regarding your findings.

 

Deliverables:

  • At least 20+ small sketch models

 

  • Sustainable solutions and Materials report due Tuesday.

 

  • At least 10 precedent examples analysed and uploaded to your blog

 

  • Create a Group blog – Please fill out this form http://goo.gl/forms/NzJxxPrlFA

 

  • All work to be posted on group blog

Sustainable Solutions

The aim of this project, under the title KAITIAKITANGA, is to start you thinking about how designing (and building) forces you to have an opinion – and your design could be thought of as an ‘argument’ supporting or opposing that opinion. There is no such thing as a ‘neutral’ position for design because you are making a proposal to change the world, a city, a street, a house or a room. These reports will reveal important information that will allow you to take a stance, to have an opinion and to become more knowledgeable about our environment and the way we live.

Divide the report up and summarize your findings. You are to use Arial size 10 font so that it is consistent. Feel free to use relevant images etc. You will then need to collate the individual reports into 1 Pdf for the whole class to be able to access. This needs to be given to Mercia after class on Tuesday the 21st of April. You will then be expected to present an outline of your group’s findings. This will occur Tuesday morning.

Group 01

synthesis-community-vulnerability-resilience-and-adaptation-to-climate-change-in-nz_53

Elliot / Julia / Pieta / Kelly / Rochelle /  Bianca

REPORT_Community vulnerability…

Group 02

climate-futures_152

Greta / Lewis / Natalie / Liam / Bree / Connor / Sophana / Helen / Maddie / Greer / Paige /  Amber

REPORT_Climate Futures Summary

Group 03

Towards carbon-neutral and climate-adapted domestic buildings_54

Sarah /  Emi /  Vanessa / Megan / Nga Roma / Christina / Etanah

REPORT_Towards Carbon Neutral Dwelling

Group 04

Greater-Wellington-Socio-Demographic-Profile-1986-2031-Profeessor-Natalie-Jackson-2012_98

Ellie / Byony / Liv /  Anna / Emily / Cassandra / Molly Brankin

REPORT_SocioDemographicProfile

Group 05

FutureHousing_10

Will / Jordyn

REPORT_Housing future in New Zealand

Group 06

Materials Report

Bamboo / Sasha / Molly Smith / Joe

REPORT_Materials Report

Group 07

Site Analysis

Irina / Zoe / Christopher / Lee

REPORT_Site + Info-Future Forecasting + Info-Climate in the Wellington Region

week 8

4p321r8ligy9r6xkDiagrammatic development drawings

What?

  • Site Analysis group to present findings.
  • Discussion on limitations and parameters of design, including restrictions based on site and assessment details.
  • Workshop reading, understanding and drawing Plans, Sections and Sectional Perspectives.
  • Workshop experimenting with generator terms through drawing, space planing and identifying and zones.
  • Group reviews.

Why?

  • This project will be run slightly differently, it will require you to “sprint” hit deadlines faster, work in groups and design at a quicker pace. Conditions will continually be changing and will require you to adapt to new designs and issues that will arise. This is not to scare or to intimidate you but to give you an idea of what it is like to design from concept to completion in industry.
  • It is important to be agile with your design process, to be able to develop responses fast, to test and progress your design, not only by yourself, but in groups. To commit to your ideas and concepts to a high level of detail across scales. The only way to develop these skills is to practice them.

How?

  • Take turns to swap and analyse each others drawings and models. Then extend your understanding refining this information to develop your design for the next stage of your project.
  • What is the programme or intent of the spaces you are designing? Investigate the programme requirements in detail starting with a thorough group discussion.
  • Consider methods to radicalize your ideas, progressing from ideas to spatial concept. How do you create a sense of place and the experience of moving through the space?

Deliverables: 

  • Minimum of 25+ drawings experimenting with a range of different ideas in plan and section.

 

  • Parti Diagrams explaining/ exploring circulation, wet zones, Public, Private, generator terms etc

 

  • Complete a final design for next week’s group presentations including a Plan, Section and interior Perspectives.

 

  • All work to be posted on group blog

 

week 9

 

“The strength of a good design lies in ourselves and in our ability to perceive the world with both emotion and reason.” – Peter Zumthor | Thinking Architecture

Screen Shot 2015-04-29 at 8.25.44 PM

What?

  • Introduction to the 1:1 Material Detail
  • Class discussion on project development
  • Break Down/ Refinement of brief/ identification of project scope
  • Understanding Sectional perspectives
  • Generative design exercises
  • Group reviews

 

Why?

  • Through playing and experimentation sketch models and drawings can be a process of thinking by doing, so play, experiment, create and you will find that it will start to inform your design ideas. To understand the scale of the site and programme requirements, and how to rethink these.
  • It is important to be flexible and to gain a general understanding of how various Building Information Modelling (BIM) enabled programmes (Revit, Vectorworks, Archicad) work. Generally the principles are the same but require practice, trial and error to really understand the process. An important skill to develop and maintain.

 

How?

  • The 1:1 material model is NOT a construction detail (we haven’t taught you that yet!). It is a ‘composition’ of materials &/or textures that suggest how materials ‘sit’ next to each other, and ideally, with a suggestion of proportion eg. lots of concrete and a little wood, or piles of gravel and a small amount of metal framing.
  • At the start of each week as a group you will need to reassess the development of the project narrowing down the final design week by week.
  • Sign in to Lynda.com and watch the tutorials
  • Here is the intro presentation for the 1:1 Material Detail …… materialFabrication.pptx

Deliverables:

  • 1:1 Material Detail per person- Final Due Monday 5pm

 

  • Continuation of project.

 

  • Start tutorials on revit in preparation for next week.

 

  • Complete a final design for next week’s group presentations including a Plan, Sectional Perspective and Interior Perspectives.

 

  • All process work uploaded to your blog.

week 10

 

“Recognizing the need is the primary condition for design.”  – Charles Eames

joshlewis section

Joshua Lewis – Kaitiakitanga 2014 Section

What?

  • Introduction to revit.
  • Group reviews
  • Class discussion on project development
  • Break Down/ Refinement of brief/ identification of project scope
  • Continuation of project

Why?

  • At the start of each week we will reassess the development of the project continuing to narrow down the final design week by week.
  • It is important to be attending classes and getting feedback on your work particularly in-group reviews.
  • It is important to be flexible and to gain a general understanding of how various Building Information Modelling (BIM) enabled programmes (Revit, Vectorworks, Archicad) work generally the principles are the same but require practice, trial and error to really understand the process. An important skill to develop and maintain.

How?

  • At the start of each week as a group you will need to reassess the development of the project narrowing down the final design week by week.
  • Consider methods to radicalize your ideas, progressing from ideas to spatial concept. How do you create a sense of place and the experience of moving through the space?
  • Oliver Blair will be giving everyone an introduction into how to use Revit

Deliverables:

  • Small Group pin up presentations.

 

  • Continuation of project.

 

  • Plan Drawn using Revit

 

  • A0 Draft poster

 

  • All process work uploaded to your blog.

Screen Shot 2015-05-12 at 6.30.00 PM

Sketchup to Revit tutorial: www.spatialdesign.info/blog/tutorials/sketchup-to-revit/

Week 11

 

7924475630_acf78d9c75_c

What?

  • Introduction to Section Model
  • Group reviews of A0 Poster
  • Class discussion on project development
  • Refinement of your project/ identification of project scope
  • Continuation of project

 

Why?

  • Group discussions should now be reassessing the finer details and further refinement of the project.
  • You will be submitting your Section Models on Tuesday at the presentation So make sure you are working efficiently as a team, delegate tasks and make the most of each team member’s strengths. Staying on top of requirements, what is due when etc.. is essential when working in practice you may have to work on several projects at once consecutively and sequentially. Often with different deadlines for the same project.
  • You have worked really hard over the last 5 weeks it is now time to put your best work forward sell us your design!

How?

  • Continue to discuss and reflect on your work as a group
  • This time of year gets pretty stressful! Take care of yourselves, Eat, Drink, Sleep, Exercise keep us in the loop with any problems, and don’t try to ‘ride out’ the problems on your own.

Deliverables:

 

  • A0 draft poster of final design

 

  • Section Model

 

  • Continuation of project for final presentation on Tuesday

 

  • All work posted to your blog

 

 

 

 

week 12

 

“Creativity is inventing, experimenting, growing, taking risks, breaking rules, making mistakes, and having fun.” — Mary Lou Cook

 

IMG_1207

 

Testing Panel by Barefoot Studios 2015

What?

  • Resolution of final work
  • Presentation Test Review of Poster
  • Responding to Feedback
  • Submission of final work

Why?

  • It is important to learn how to edit your work it is not always necessary to show every single thing that you have done that is what your blog is for, be selective what is going to get your idea across and sell your project.
  • You have worked really hard and it is now time to put your best work forward show us your design and be proud of your work!

How?

  • Practice presenting your work to your friends, classmates and family the more you do it the easier it becomes
  • Take care of yourselves, keep us in the loop with any problems, and don’t try to ‘ride out’ the problems on your own.

 

Deliverables:

  • Presentation of poster

 

  • Design response to final feedback

 

  • Final hand in at the end of the week

 

  • All work uploaded to your group blog for marking

 

requirements:

 

Drawing/ digital/ mixed media

  • 1:50 Plan/s
  • 1:50 Section/s or Sectional Perspective
  • Elevation
  • Key Perspectives
  • Sketch, diagrams and generative process drawings
  • 1:20 Scale Model
  • 1:1 Material Model Per person
  • Sketch and concept generator models
  • Body of work displayed on blog

* All Work to be presented on a Large Format Poster template will be given to you.

references:

NZS 3604:2011 Timber-framed buildings. (February 2011), Standards New Zealand: Wellington, N.Z.

Bates, S., Kane, C. The future of housing in New Zealand

Coleman, A. Squeezed in and squeezed out : the effects of population ageing on the demand for housing

Coles, J. (2007). The fundamentals of interior architecture. Lausanne: AVA Academia. [also as e-book]

Hosey, L. (2012) The Shape of Green: aesthetics, ecology and design. Washington; DC: Island Press.

Melchionne, K. (1998). Living in Glass Houses. In Taylor, M., & Preston, J. (2006). Intimus: interior design theory reader. Chichester: John Wiley, 228-232

Muller-Scholl, A. (2013). Manuscript : essentials for the everyday use of interior architects and designers. Basel : Birkhauser Va, 2013. (recommend textbook)

Pringle, T., & Bennett, M. (2011). House building guide. Porirua, N.Z. : BRANZ, 2011. (recommend textbook)

Spiller, N. (2013). Drawing Architecture AD. Hoboken, New Jersey: Wiley.

Synthesis: Community vulnerability, resilience and adaptation to climate change in New Zealand

 

online resources:

wellington.govt.nz/services/environment-and-waste/sustainability/build-sustainably-in-wellington/wellington-conditions

wellington.govt.nz/webmap/wccmap.html?xmin=1725987&ymin=5405556&xmax=1774737&ymax=5436380&base=0&map=4

www.gw.govt.nz/environmental-science/

www.gw.govt.nz/document-library-2/detail/778

sustainablecities.org.nz

www.victoria.ac.nz/sgees/research-centres/documents/synthesis-community-vulnerability-resilience-and-adaptation-to-climate-change-in-nz.pdf

www.youtube.com/watch?v=a42UnqSKMyo

www.mfe.govt.nz/publications/sustainability/passive-solar-design-guidance

www.transitiontowns.org.nz/node/1667

TED Talks :

www.ted.com/playlists/28/sustainability_by_design

 

Assessment:

1) Discuss their own work and the work of others using a critical approach. (C2) [Matauranga]1.

Assessment criteria for this project:

Engage in, and document (digital workbook/blog) the review of precedent, peer and own work. Demonstrate this engagement in design decisions.

 

2)Demonstrate competency in techniques, skills and processes for spatial design. (D1, D2) [Mohio] 2.

Assessment criteria for this project:

Exploration of digital and analogue modes of representation, particularly plans and sections, to demonstrate understanding of occupied space and building materiality.

3) Utilise analytical, selective and creative processes in order to transform ideas into material outcomes. (D3) [Mohio] 3.

Assessment criteria for this project:

Recasting of ‘spatial generator’ concept in response to information on building materials, planning, services and other project parameters (eg. single dwelling).

4) Apply investigative skills in order to source and use a range of resources/materials supporting the development of their work. (E4) [Matauranga] 4.

Assessment criteria for this project:

Completion of tasks relating to heritage, future housing and sustainability in Aotearoa / New Zealand, as required to provide an informed basis for design decision making.

Last modified: May 25, 2015