Space – Atea – 2019
224.157 Design Studio I (SPACE)

Learning Outcomes – Student Blogs – 1.A 1.B 2.A 2.B 3.A 3.B 4.A 4.B 5.A 5.B 6.A 6.B – Assessment

Cherry Shiu - 2019

Cherry Shiu – 2019

Overview

In this studio course students will be introduced to creative and analytical thinking skills, idea generation and visualisation common to art and design practice. They will begin to acquire specific techniques, skills and processes for the definition and investigation of physical, temporal and digital spatial environments and their inhabitation. They will learn to discuss and evaluate their work and the work of their peers.

This course is about understanding, representing and creating 3D space through a range of design processes.

Specifically, students will analyse the site and design a new space each week that responds to both the site and Mihimihi/Atea.

Learning outcomes

Students who successfully complete this course will be able to:

  • Show an introductory understanding of the relationship between creative work and how it is perceived
    [Whanaungatanga/Connectedness]

 

  • Demonstrate a willingness to explore a range of ideas and take risks in creative development
    [Toi/Creativity]

 

  • Participate constructively in discussion in relation to their own work and that of their peers
    [Matauranga/Understanding]

 

  • Demonstrate basic competency in techniques, skills and processes for the definition and investigation of physical and digital spatial environments and their inhabitation
    [Mohio/Virtuosity]

 

  • Communicate and present work in a clear and considered way
    [Whanaungatanga/Connectedness]

More information available at the 224.157 SPACE page on massey.ac.nz

See the Terms for more information and definition of key terms.

 

The brief: Design the spatial experience of a musical act within the Opera House lane.

Each week you will design a new concept for this brief.

 

Schedule

Image 162

 

1.A

Atea

Atea Intro lecture

This paper responds to aspects of Atea. It examines the corresponding ideas of encounters with places and people; conversations/discourse; challenges; process (tikanga [practices and rules]); and the dynamic and, at times, challenging and confrontational spaces of meeting.

Atea begins as the space of the meeting of ideas: what is your position? How do you articulate that position through art and design, and the words you say and write? How do encounters with other people and their positions (their ideas, objects, images and experiences) affect you and your work?

5_emmanuelle_moureaux_Forest_of_Numbers

www.emmanuellemoureaux.com/forest-of-numbers

 

Class exercise: 

youtu.be/1NwgIhDzlN4
youtu.be/QczxCxFRUf0

Plan view

A plan is a top down view, like a map except that we can see inside the design.
To achieve this inside view, a horizontal plane cuts through the “shell” of the design with the top part of the “shell” being hidden from view.

 

 

Independent study:

  • Pick a musical artist to design for (choose something with a lot of style/texture/aesthetic to work with) to be approved by a staff member.
  • Gather reference material (precedent stage designs, music videos, album covers etc)
  • Sketch ideas in plan view
  • Make a new blog and add it to the blog form
  • Upload your work to your blog

 

 

1.B

Materiality

serpentinegallerypavilion03

 

“We all have 10,000 bad drawings in us. The sooner we get them out the better.”
– Walt Stanchfield

The site for your SPACE designs will be Opera House Lanegoo.gl/maps/3UjaY9faHrS2

Independent study:

  • Take lots of site photos (minimum x10)
  • Sketch lots of site drawings (minimum x10)
  • Complete a collaged plan of your musical act design that expresses the materiality
  • Upload your work to your blog,everything you have done for this course should be uploaded to your blog, the “final” works, but also any experiments, drafts or tests, both “good” and “bad”

 

2.A

Interior/Exterior

Pedro_Pegenaute_©-PG466_087

Pedro Pegenaute

 

  • Discuss workload and expectations
  • In small groups show plans from last week (do we need to do a small exercise in PS to complete these?)
  • Pick another musical artist, something quite different from last weeks.

 

Section

A section is exactly like a plan except we look straight-on at the design, with the cutting plane being vertical eg; slicing through a cake and seeing all the different layers of icing, cream, jam and chocolate.

  • Section sketching exercise
  • Start researching new musical artist/act.
  • What are some simple design techniques to start the concept?
  • Meet with staff in pairs to discuss design direction.
  • Sketchup tutorial and exercise

Independent study:

  • Pick your second musical artist to design for (choose something quite different from your first choice)
  • Gather reference material (precedent stage designs, music videos, album covers etc)
  • Sketch ideas in section view
  • Upload your work to your blog

2.B

Threshold

Exodus, or the voluntary prisoners of architecture. Rem Koolhaas‘ 1972 Architectural Association thesis (together with Madelon Vreisendorp, Elia Zenghelis, and Zoe Zenghelis)

Exodus, or the voluntary prisoners of architecture.
Rem Koolhaas‘ 1972 Architectural Association thesis (together with Madelon Vreisendorp, Elia Zenghelis, and Zoe Zenghelis)

socks-studio.com/2011/03/19/exodus-or-the-voluntary-prisoners-of-architecture/

Portal gameplay: youtu.be/0P2dzIa6pZY

Oki Sato: youtu.be/uM-i3a9i9wk

Design session:

  • quickly sketch 4 ideas for the musician Rone (Bye Bye Macadam) (1 min each)
  • in groups combine these into a 3D model
  • iterate on other groups work
  • section the 3D model
  • iterate on the design in photoshop

Independent study:

  • Complete a section of your musical act design using SketchUp and Photoshop
  • Upload your work to your blog,everything you have done for this course should be uploaded to your blog, the “final” works, but also any experiments, drafts or tests, both “good” and “bad”

 

3.A

Light/Dark

endeavors-by-tadao-ando-_dezeen_2364_hero1-852x479

Church of Light
Architect: Tadao Ando

These images are of Tadao Ando’s minimalist Church located in the outskirts of Osaka. The forms and geometry of the building are very simple accentuating the elegant relationship between the light and dark space. A seemingly simple idea of cutting out shapes into the wall, create an affective experience for the occupants that will only change as the sun tracks through the sky. Lacking the ornamental elements of other churches, manipulation of light is a key architectural feature in the design, combined with the materiality and form of this space the result is a modest yet powerful building.

More information here: www.archute.com/church-of-the-light/

Elevation

The drawing of an exterior of the deign as if seen from straight-on. Elevations are like sections, without the cutting plane, so no cake has been sliced yet :/ With a Section you are drawing the space while elevations depict the surface.

  • Quickly sketch an elevation

The tricky thing about elevations, like plans and sections, they have no perspective.

 

Indigo Renderer

Indigo is a realistic rendering engine for 3D model visualisation.
At Massey Spatial Design we use it with Sketchup (and a sketchup plugin Skindigo).

The Indigo renderer enables quick analysis of accurate lighting conditions and materiality from a digital model,  which makes it particularly useful for us as spatial designers.

“Indigo Renderer is an unbiased, physically based and photorealistic renderer which simulates the physics of light to achieve near-perfect image realism.”

“With an advanced physical camera model, a super-realistic materials system and the ability to simulate complex lighting situations through Metropolis Light Transport, Indigo Renderer is capable of producing the highest levels of realism demanded by architectural and product visualization.”

Indigo Renderer Website: indigorenderer.com

Indigo Renderer resources

Library Revist. SketchUp model rendered in Indigo.
 

Take a look at the indigo gallery for more examples of what indigo can achieve.

Screen Shot 2016-03-14 at 8.11.31 AM

Rendering Plans and Sections with Sketchup and Indigo

  • In Sketchup, use the “Section Plane” tool under the “Tools” menu to slice your model.
  • You can move the section plane up or down with the move tool (you may need to select it first)

Screen Shot 2016-03-14 at 8.22.31 AM

  • To render this, right click on the “Section Plane” and select “Enable Section Plane

Screen Shot 2016-03-14 at 8.24.17 AM

  • Then select “Render Scene” from the “Extensions” “Skindigo” menu (or click the multicoloured indigo logo button)

Screen Shot 2016-03-14 at 8.24.48 AM

  • In Sketchup, Switch the camera mode to “Parallel Projection” under the “Camera” menu.
  • Then change to a top down view under “Camera” “Standard views” “Top
  • Render the scene again.

Screen Shot 2016-03-14 at 8.29.44 AM

Now you can save this render and concept into photoshop to combine with your sketches, materials/textures etc.

Independent study:

  • Pick your third musical artist to design for
  • Gather reference material (precedent stage designs, music videos, album covers etc)
  • Sketch ideas
  • Upload your work to your blog

 

3.B

Contrast

c07ff052854a7782eae1ca2137e1f63eda1da4d3-4741x3548

dsrny.com/project/high-line

THE HIGH LINE
Designed in collaboration with James Corner Field Operations and Piet Oudolf, The High Line is a 1.5–mile long public park built on an abandoned elevated railroad stretching from the Meatpacking District to the Hudson Rail Yards in Manhattan. Inspired by the melancholic, unruly beauty of this postindustrial ruin, where nature has reclaimed a once vital piece of urban infrastructure, the new park interprets its inheritance. It translates the biodiversity that took root after it fell into ruin in a string of site–specific urban micro-climates along the stretch of railway that include sunny, shady, wet, dry, windy, and sheltered spaces.

  • Share your design idea with peers (small groups)
  • Give input towards others ideas
  • Design using sketchup and indigo to generate strong lighting concepts

Independent study:

  • Complete a plan, section and elevation of your musical act design using indigo renderer.
  • Document your iterations towards this design as you go
  • Upload your work to your blog,everything you have done for this course should be uploaded to your blog, the “final” works, but also any experiments, drafts or tests, both “good” and “bad”

 

4.A

Experience/Time

Project 360° Amsterdam – Four Psychogeographical Maps (Graduation Project 2007)
Artist: Frank DRESMÉ

The artist here has mapped a psychogeographical experience of the city. The definition of that is:

“Psychogeography is an exploration of urban environments that emphasizes playfulness and “drifting”. It has links to the Situationist International.”

He combines real elements (i.e. photos and drawings of materials, buildings, signs) in combination with less tangible ideas (i.e. time, his directional decisions, what grabs his focus/imagination). The result is a collage mapping not only a space but an individuals experience of time.
Source: www.frankdresme.com/project360

 

Presentation

  • In small groups (10 or so) present your work from last week
  • Discuss what is working well with the project, but also what could work better.
  • What are ways to improve the work.

 

Perspective

The drawing of a space as if we’re standing within and looking at it. The critical aspect of a successful perspective is that it has a foreground, middle ground and background, ensure all your perspectives have this. Also, we want to be looking from a human point of view (p.o.v.), we’re designing for humans, not superman/birds/clouds/bugs etc.

 

  • Sketch the site in perspective

 

Video

FAULTLINES – final edit from Lee Gibson on Vimeo.

annabellecolespace.blogspot.co.nz/2014/08/twelfth-lecture.html

THE HOUSE from Alex York on Vimeo.

The Lonely Hall from Dan Smith on Vimeo.

Thesis Experimentation… from Lee Gibson on Vimeo.

 

Twinmotion

As a team, help each other export a video of your design now rendered in real time in twinmotion.

The software is fairly straight forward, however you will need to look up information from other sources including the Twinmotion page on the spatial design website

  • Read the TwinMotion information (in the tutorials link at the top of the page)
  • Import your sketchup model
  • Export a Video
  • Upload to your blog

Review your design in twinmotion, how does it feel?
Is it communicating the qualities of your design?

  • Update your design
  • Export another video

Update your design in response to your experience with Twinmotion.
Does it need to be simpler? More complex? Maybe a different texture or some lighting added?

How different from “Twinmotion” can you get it to look?

Twinmotion is just one software that can render in real time, the simplest we’ve found so far.
There are many others and all have their benefits and costs, feel free to test these out.

The best quality real time render currently is Cryengine.
Also the Unreal and Unity engines is good.

Try to focus on real time rendering as this is the way the industry is heading and in future software will be much more integrated into the design process.

Elaborate immersive experiences can be crafted using these technologies and strategies also to really communicate more and more aspects of a design/space/experience. See Oculus VR

shyam-space.tumblr.com/

Independent study:

  • Pick your final musical artist to design for (can be an artist you’ve previously chosen or something new)
  • Gather reference material (precedent stage designs, music videos, album covers etc)
  • Sketch ideas in plan, section, elevation and perspective view
  • Produce 5x short clips exploring the experience and time of your design
  • Upload your work to your blog

4.B

Figure Ground

Anna Hunt, site analysis, 2012

Anna Hunt, site analysis, 2012

Sketching exercise

  • Sketch in plan a figure/ground drawing of the site, leave the built structures white and fill in black the spaces between.
  • Sketch in section a figure.ground drawing of your current design idea, leave the built structures white and fill in black the spaces between.

Video Editing

For this project we’ll briefly introduce Adobe Premiere for some simple video editing. Here is a Premiere Easy Guide to get started (thanks to Mike from Fine Arts).

  • Compose a sequence of video using your Twinmotion exports.

Independent study:

  • Complete a plan, section, elevation and perspective of your musical act design.
  • Complete a video sketch using Premiere that shows the journey through your design.
  • Document your iterations towards this design as you go

 

5.A

Symmetry

LORN – ANVIL
GERIKO

We are two visual artists / filmmakers.

– Hélène Jeudy & Antoine Caëcke –
(aka GERIKO)

Facebook: www.facebook.com/gerikofilm
Instagram: www.instagram.com/gerikofilm
Vimeo: www.vimeo.com/geriko

Kurzgesagt Beauty (Symmetry) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-O5kNPlUV7w

Exercise

  • Sketch spatially symmetrical sketches (blind pairs)
  • Present last weeks work to each other
  • Quickly present one of pairs work to the class (1min present, 1min feedback) via blog

Video edit tutorial (for those that missed last week)

Independent study:

  • Continue working on your design
  • Document your iterations towards this design as you go

 

 

5.B

Program

Independent study:

  • Continue working on your design
  • Prepare  your presentation for Monday or Tuesday next week
    • Plan, Section, Elevation and Perspectives..
    • Short video (20-30s) of your design that communicates the experience of entering, going through and leaving.
  • Document your iterations towards this design as you go

 

 

6.A

 Present

 

Independent study:

  • Continue working on your design, reflect on the feedback given by peers and staff.
  • Document your iterations towards this design as you go.

 

 

6.B

Reflect

 

 

Independent study:

  • Complete a refined and developed plan, section, elevation and perspective of your musical act design responding to the feedback given during your presentation.
  • Complete a short video (20-30s) of your design that communicates the experience of entering, going through and leaving your design.
  • Document your iterations towards this design as you go
  • Upload your work to your blog,everything you have done for this course should be uploaded to your blog, the “final” works, but also any experiments, drafts or tests, both “good” and “bad”

 

Learning outcomes

Students who successfully complete this course will be able to:

  • Show an introductory understanding of the relationship between creative work and how it is perceived
    [Whanaungatanga/Connectedness]
  • Demonstrate a willingness to explore a range of ideas and take risks in creative development
    [Toi/Creativity]
  • Participate constructively in discussion in relation to their own work and that of their peers
    [Matauranga/Understanding]
  • Demonstrate basic competency in techniques, skills and processes for the definition and investigation of physical and digital spatial environments and their inhabitation
    [Mohio/Virtuosity]
  • Communicate and present work in a clear and considered way
    [Whanaungatanga/Connectedness]

More information available at the 224.157 SPACE page on massey.ac.nz

 

 

Assessment Criteria

You will be assessed on:

  • How clearly you communicate your (mihimihi/atea) concepts via spatial drawing conventions.
    [Whanaungatanga/Connectedness]

 

  • Demonstrate engagement with the design processes introduced in this class by documenting a range of spatial drawing explorations on your blog.
    [Toi/Creativity]

 

  • Through group discussion with your peers and staff, begin to develop the ability to critique your own work/that of others and apply this feedback to your design work.
    [Matauranga/Understanding]

 

  • The overall craft of the spatial explorations documented on your blog and how these reflect your concepts.
    [Mohio/Virtuosity]

 

  • Considered communication of your body of design explorations, clearly organised on your blog.
    [Whanaungatanga/Connectedness]

Last modified: August 12, 2019